Friday, May 24, 2013

FOTOS: Los tornados causan estragos en EE.UU.


Una mujer lleva a un niño a través de un campo cerca de la escuela derrumbada Plaza Towers Elementary en Moore, Oklahoma, el 20 de mayo. Un tornado tanto como la mitad de una milla de ancho, con vientos de hasta 200 mph rugió a través del Oklahoma City suburbios Lunes, aplanando barrios enteros, incendiando edificios y el aterrizaje de un golpe directo en una escuela primaria. (Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press)



Un tornado pasa a través del sur de Oklahoma City, el 20 de mayo. (Paul Hellstern / The Oklahoman vía Associated Press)



Esta imagen difundida por la NASA en mayo 21 y adquirida el 20 de mayo por el espectrorradiómetro de imágenes de resolución moderada (MODIS) en el satélite Aqua NASAǃÙs muestra el sistema de la tormenta a las 2:40 pm hora Central Daylight (19:40 tiempo universal), a pocos minutos antes de que el devastador tornado comenzó. Según el Servicio Meteorológico Nacional y los informes de los medios de comunicación, más allá de toda tornado tenía una clasificación preliminar de los daños de EF-4, con vientos de alcanzar 190 millas por hora. Tenía una velocidad de avance relativamente lento para tal stormǃÓabout violentos 20ǃÏ25 millas por hourǃÓlikely agrava el daño. Los escombros del tornado cayó hasta 100 millas (160 kilómetros) de distancia, llegando a la ciudad de Tulsa. El tornado masivo que cortó una franja amplia y mortal a través de una ciudad suburbana Oklahoma City, matando a 24 personas, es un sistema de ultima categoría EF5 con vientos de más de 200 mph (321 kmh). (NASA)


Un niño que se saca de los escombros de la Escuela Primaria Plaza Towers en Moore, Oklahoma, y pasó junto a los socorristas del 20 de mayo. Un tornado tanto como una milla (1,6 kilometros) de ancho, con vientos de hasta 200 mph (320 kph) rugió a través del Oklahoma City suburbios Lunes, aplanando barrios enteros, incendiando edificios y el aterrizaje de un golpe directo en una escuela primaria. (Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press)


Esta foto aérea muestra los restos de las viviendas afectadas por un tornado masivo en Moore, Oklahoma, el 20 de mayo. (Steve Gooch / Associated Press)



Una mujer se sacó de debajo de los escombros tornado en la Escuela Torres Plaza en Moore, Oklahoma, el 20 de mayo. (Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press)



Victor Gonzalez seeks shelter from the rain under a sheet of plastic as he helps a friend salvage items from a tornado-ravaged home on May 21 in Moore, Okla. A huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds.


Two men attempt to pry open a door on this car to check for victims in a business parking lot west of I-35 south of 4th Street in Moore, on May 20.



A monstrous tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburbs, flattening entire neighborhoods with winds up to 200 mph, setting buildings on fire and landing a direct blow on an elementary school.



A fire burns in the Tower Plaza Addition in Moore, Okla., following a tornado on May 20.



People look for belongings after a tornado struck Moore, Okla., on May 20.



A massive tornado swept through the south Oklahoma City suburb Monday afternoon.



June Simson, right, receives a hug from her neighbor Jo McGee while embracing her cat Sammi after she found him standing on the rubble of her destroyed home on May 21 in Moore, Okla. Families returned to a blasted moonscape that had been an American suburb Tuesday after a monstrous tornado tore through the outskirts of Oklahoma City, killing at least 24 people.



This aerial photo shows a home demolished home by Monday's tornado, in Moore, Okla., on May 21.


Oklahoma City firefighters check on the status of Gene Tripp as he sits in his rocking chair where his home once stood after being destroyed by a tornado that hit the area on May 20 in Oklahoma City, Okla. (Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman via Associated Press)



Ryan Saum removes belongings from his car that was thrown onto Briarwood Elementary School by yesterday's tornado on May 21 in Moore, Okla. The town reported a tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down yesterday killing at least 24 people and leveling everything in its path.



Two frightened and apparently lost dogs sit on a coffee table top in a destroyed neighborhood in Moore, Okla., on May 21.


US Soldiers and Airmen with the Oklahoma Army National Guard and the Oklahoma Air National Guard along with firefighters participate in recovery efforts after a tornado moved through on May 20 in Moore, Okla. The town reported a tornado to be at least EF4 strength and two miles wide that touched down Monday leveling everything in its path.



Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings.



A massive storm front swept north through the central United States on Sunday, hammering the region with fist-sized hail, blinding rain and tornadoes, including a half-mile wide twister that struck near Oklahoma City.



A tornado caused extensive damage along Interstate 40 at the junction with US 177 on the west side of Shawnee, Okla., on May 19.


A toppled car and crushed trees lay next to the slab of a house swept off its foundation in the destroyed Rancho Brazos neighborhood of Granbury, Texas, on May 16.


Intact homes (upper left) stand next to totally destroyed dwellings showing the path of the May 20 tornado in Oklahoma City, Okla., on May 22.Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. Curvature of horizon in the photo is due to an ultra-wide angle lens.



Police stand beside two men sitting handcuffed on the street whom they have detained on suspicion of looting in Moore, Okla., on May 21.



Sarah Dick reads a Doctor Suess book to her three-year-old daughter Jadyn at the driveway of her tornado-destroyed house in Oklahoma City, Okla., on May 22.Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. The Boston Globe

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